Verizon Cloud Powered by AMD's SeaMicro SM15000

By - Source: AMD Press Release

AMD said on Monday that Verizon is deploying its SeaMicro SM15000 servers for the Verizon Cloud Compute and Verizon Cloud Storage platforms. The two companies have also co-developed hardware and software for these servers to reserve, allocate and guarantee application service level agreements, or SLAs. Thus AMD claims that Verizon Cloud customers can "confidently" deploy mission critical systems in the public cloud for the first time.

AMD's SeaMicro engineers and Verizon reportedly worked together for over two years to create a new public cloud platform with enterprise class capabilities. These include virtual machine server provisioning in "minutes", fine-grained server configuration options, shared disks across multiple server instances, strict traffic isolation, data encryption and data inspection, guaranteed network performance and more.

"The technology we developed turns the cloud paradigm upside down by creating a service that an enterprise can configure and control as if the equipment were in its own data center," said Andrew Feldman, corporate vice president and general manager, Server, AMD. "With this innovation in cloud services, I expect enterprises to migrate their core IT services and mission critical applications to Verizon’s cloud services."

AMD's SeaMicro SM15000 brings together compute, networking and storage in a single 10 rack, energy-efficient system. This server provides 64 sockets for AMD Opteron ("Piledriver"), Intel Xeon E3-1260L ("Sandy Bridge") and E3-1265Lv2 ("Ivy Bridge") processors, or 256 sockets for Intel's Atom N570 processors. This server also supports up to 4 terabytes of RAM, up to sixteen 10 GbE uplinks or up to sixty-four 1 GbE uplinks. The server even links 160 gigabits of I/O networking, and more than five petabytes of storage with a 1.28 terabyte high-performance supercompute fabric, called Freedom Fabric.

"The SeaMicro SM15000 server also supports the Freedom Fabric Storage products, enabling a single system to connect with more than five petabytes of storage capacity in two racks," reads AMD's press release. "This approach delivers the benefits of expensive and complex solutions such as network attached storage (NAS) and storage area networking (SAN) with the simplicity and low cost of direct attached storage."

Verizon revealed its new cloud platform late last week. Verizon's Cloud Compute service is supposedly built for speed and performance, allowing users to determine and establish virtual machine and network performance, configure storage performance, and attach storage to multiple virtual machines. Verizon's Cloud Storage service is an object-addressable, multi-tenant storage platform providing "safe, durable, reliable and cost-effective" storage accessible from anywhere on the Web.

"We reinvented the public cloud from the ground up to specifically address the needs of our enterprise clients," said John Considine, chief technology officer at Verizon Terremark. "We wanted to give them back control of their infrastructure -- providing the speed and flexibility of a generic public cloud with the performance and security they expect from an enterprise-grade cloud. Our collaboration with AMD enabled us to develop revolutionary technology, and it represents the backbone of our future plans."

For more information about AMD's SM15000 servers, head here. For more information about Verizon Cloud, and to enter the beta, head here.

Kevin Parrish is a contributing editor and writer for Tom's Hardware, Tom's Games, Tom's Guide and Tom’s IT Pro. He's also a graphic artist, CAD operator and network administrator.

See here for all of Kevin's Tom's IT Pro articles.

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